Blog - Nichol Joy Chase Yoga
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So, I have made it to the half-way point.  I am 100 postures in, and I have 100 more to go. The half-way point is always hard; it is usually when I want to give up.  It is hard because you know how much work it was to get to where you are, and you know that it will be that much work OR MORE to finish. I have let a few weeks (three to be exact) lapse.  And, I could blame it on my busy schedule during the holiday season and the fact that I am still getting settled in a BIG new city (if you are lost here...

The postures this week rely heavily upon your arms.  Your arms must provide a strong support system.  The postures are: Parsva Sarvangasana, Setu Bandha Sarvangasana (pictured left), Eka Pada Setu Bandha Sarvangasana, and Urdhva Padmasana in Sarvangasana. The hand and arm position is very similar to most of the other Sarvangasana postures, HOWEVER, you are placing a lot more weight on your wrists and arms.  SO...

We ended last week with Halasana and Karnapidasana.  These two postures are very closed; you are deeply folded into yourself; you are enshrouded with yourself.  This week we will begin to come out of our shell - like a flower we will begin to blossom. The postures this week are Supta Konasana, Parsva Halasana, Eka Pada Sarvangasana, and Parsvaika Pada Sarvangasana (pictured left).  When linked together and practiced in this order, these postures have an effect like a flower that blossoms with exposure to the sun.       Our journey starts with Karnapidasana (picture 1 below).  Straighten your legs, spread them apart and clasp your big toes to open up into Supta...

For a month we will be immersed in shoulderstand territory.  It is a good place to be.  Here is what Iyengar says about shoulderstand: "By practising these various Sarvangasana movements, the entire body is toned by an increase in the flow of  blood and by the elimination of toxin-forming waste matter.  These asanas STIMULATE ONE LIKE TONICS.  After convalescing one can practise them for speedier recovery from weakness." If you practice Sarvangasana (shoulderstand) regularly, you already know the profound effect it has on your body.  And, I don't have to tell you that it works like a powerful tonic. For those of you that don't practice Sarvangasana regularly, perhaps...

Life is comprised of a series of periods; a series of cycles.  You complete one cycle and transition to another.  This week is all about being in that place between cycles;  being in transition.  It is a place where you have left one cycle and have begun another, but there is some lag time; you are playing catch-up.  It is a place where you are still holding on to the familiarity of the previous cycle and adjusting to the new cycle.   I am experiencing this process of transition through my move from Stockton to Los Angeles.  So, it seems very fitting that and we are transitioning from the headstand...

I just moved to Los Angeles last Sunday, so nearly everything in my life right now feels like a work in progress.  Similarly, one of the postures this week is very much a work in progress for me.  The name of the posture is urdhva padmasana in sirsasana (pictured left - modified sirsasana II form).  And, the three postures that precede it in Light On Yoga directly effect the success of urdhva padmasana in sirsasana. The postures this week are: parivrttaikapada sirsasana, eka pada sirsasana, parsvaika pada sirsasana and of course urdhva padmasana in sirsasana. In order to get into urdhva padmasana in sirsasana and you have to be able...